Fiction | ‘Career Advice’

To say anything about the subject of ‘career choice’ is something that evokes a mild dose of guilt, occasionally, in the writer. And it doesn’t take much of the scratching of the surface for the writer to realize that the reason he sometimes feels this way, is because he is akin to a person who is no saint but yet was tasked with the goal to show his friends the exact way to heaven. But maybe, just maybe, a non-saint can say something about the way to heaven, we will see.

And another interesting thing about the writer – apart from the fact that he thinks he is no saint – is that he worships aphorists, so his words might sound like one of his many idols.

I was told you had a change of heart with regards your current path, a few words about that. Identify what you do not like about your job. (if indeed you do not.) If you do, you might prevent yourself from getting into such job again. I say this because everything that is dislike-able about a job is present in yet another.

A job – the writer affirms – that make you ignore your family is not a job, it only bears semblance to it. It is hell. So is a job that constantly seduces you into lying.

There are two school of thoughts with regards this subject.  One says you have a passion, and a wondrous career is waiting for you to be discovered. The other one can’t be more opposing, even while not obvious: develop the valuable skill sets, work on your craft, and you will find your job a happy one. The writer prefers the latter school of thought.

An old man once told me, over wine, specifically because it was important: ‘planning a career is OK, but don’t be afraid to depart; when good opportunities present themselves, pursue them.’

Like virtually everything in your milieu, the choice of a career is not immune to imitation. The writer thinks imitation can be beneficial just as it could be dangerous. As such, beware of the crowd.

This is the most important one, so I save it for the last: the path to heaven is narrow.

Yours truly,

An aspiring saint.

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